About Schindler’s Factory

About Schindler’s Factory

The name and story of Oskar Schindler, his factory and his list are well known these days, thanks to a book and a film (mostly shot in Kraków, incidentally).

Schindler,_Oskar

The factory at ul. Lipowa 4 – the Oskar Schindler Enamelled Goods Factory – now houses not only an exhibition about the man and his efforts during World War 2 to save the lives of over 1,200 Jews working in his factories but also a permanent exhibition telling the story of Kraków under Nazi occupation.

Oskar_Schindler's_desk_at_Emalia_Factory

That exhibition stars the city of Kraków, and tells the individual stories of war-time residents, the role of the city as capital of government under the Nazis, everyday life of the population, the fate of the Jews and the resistance of the Polish underground.

800px-Oskar_Schindler_enamel_factory_in_Kraków

Deutsch_Emailwaren_Fabrik

Taking advantage of the huge area offered by the factory buildings, the museum also houses MOCAK, a contemporary art museum.

mocak

To get to the Schindler Factory, take a tram to Plac Bohaterów Getta (Ghetto Heroes Square) from which it’s a 5-10 minute walk down ul Kacik, under the train bridge, onto ul, Lipowa. Electric buggies also make the journey.

Plac_Bohaterow_Getta_Kraków

Open

November to March

Mondays 10:00 – 14:00, no charge

Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 to 18:00

April to October

Monday 10:00 – 16:00, no charge (closes on the first Monday of the month at 14:00)

Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 – 20:00

Last admission will be 90 minutes before closing time. The museum recommends 1.5 to 2 hours for your visit.

Tickets:
regular 19 PLN
concessionary 16 PLN

Access

Not brilliant. You really need to be able to walk a short distance and climb a flight of stairs.

Krakow_Ghetto_06694

The Plac Bohaterów Getta, where you got off the tram, was where the Kraków Jewish Resistance met. Plac Zgody, as it was known, was the largest open space in the Kraków Ghetto. The 70 large metal chairs are meant to symbolise departure, as well as subsequent absence. The entire square is an evocative memorial to the victims of the Kraków Ghetto.

 

 

 

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